Dec 082019
 

I’m getting flak on Twitter for posting this:

The standard arguments are coming out – “parents should be allowed to use it unless required by a wheelchair user” “why didn’t you ask staff / passenger to shift” and then more unpleasant trolling. A near “Line” on Complaining Cripple Bingo – I spot:

    • *Claims disabled person only needs to ask and access obstructions will be removed*
    • “You have psychological issues”
    • “If only you had asked nicely” “You didn’t ask nicely enough”
    • *Provide incorrect or inappropriate adjustment* *Ignore disabled person explaining this*.
    • *Claims you weren’t actually negatively affected because you were able to work round the fail*
    • *Misrepresents what you said to discredit you and the validity of your complaint*

All of that, however, is a distraction. The wheelchair space must be kept clearRobin Allen QC put the argument particularly well, during the Firstbus case:

The case has in some parts being identified as being about competition between the rights of wheelchair users, and travellers with children and buggies. But we say that is not the right way to view it.

We do not say we do not suggest that parents traveling with buggies don’t have the need for assistance, or to be taken into account. We do not suggest that bus companies shouldn’t consider about the general public.

As it is, what we say, and we’ll go through this in detail of course in the submissions, is that we have a particular problem, wheelchair users, Mr. Paulley in particular; and we have been given a particular solution. And we do object to the solution to other problems being grafted on in some way that undermines the strength of the solution which we say parliament has given, through the various bits of legislation which are set out in the case.

Non-disabled people being allowed to occupy the wheelchair space until required seems like a very reasonable preposition. But the reality is different. The constant dread of having to potentially fight to get on the train and into the space; the likely snidey comments from other passengers; objections to me inconveniencing them and so on is too much; especially on top of all the other extra hassle disabled people experience trying to use the railway.

LNER’s policy on this is pretty clear. From their Azuma leaflet:

Reiterated on LNER’s website:

Prams and buggies

We’re very happy for prams to be on our trains, just as long as you make sure they’re folded at all times and stored like any other item of luggage.

Be careful not to put prams in wheelchair spaces as this might be needed later in the journey by another customer.

Sign: "Please keep this space clear for wheelchair users"And in the wheelchair spaces themselves.

LNER policy, as told to me repeatedly by a director, is that when not in use by a disabled person these spaces MUST be kept clear, and that LNER staff MUST enforce this. Sadly, however, LNER staff do not enforce it.

There were 593 seats on the train I caught today, and 2 wheelchair spaces. 2 chances for wheelchair users to get on the train. 0.3% of the chance of a non-wheelchair user.

They are wheelchair spaces. If parents need their own spaces, then I support them in getting them. But please do not abuse the spaces specifically and solely designed and placed for wheelchair users.

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